Tag Archives: ballet

Hoofer

 

Photo courtesy of Pinterest
Photo courtesy of Pinterest

Hoofer: noun. Slang. A professional dancer, especially a tap dancer. (Dictionary.com)

When I did my Fosse imitation a few weeks back, Karina, one of our commenters, suggested that I try to do a Gene Kelly imitation. I’ve tap danced before, I thought. No big deal. Continue reading Hoofer

5 Ways You Can Get Involved with Art Without Going Broke

Credit: Dale Chihuly
Credit: Dale Chihuly

We’ve been talking a lot about art you can do yourself. Sometimes, it’s just as rewarding to enjoy art that other people have created. This can get expensive (opera tickets aren’t cheap), so here are five ways you can experience art in the Minneapolis area without breaking your bank.

1. Visit an Art Museum

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts is a free museum where you can see jade sculptures from ancient China, portraits by nineteenth-century Romantic artists, and contemporary abstract paintings.

2. Hear a Concert at a Coffee Shop

The Coffee Grounds is a local coffee shop that brings in musicians ranging from folk to hip-hop on every Friday evening for a free concert. Sometimes they even have comedy troupes.

3. Watch a Ballet

The Landmark Center offers free ballet performances by members of the St. Paul City Ballet on Tuesdays at noon. They also have free classical music concerts and art exhibitions.

4. Listen to a Reading

The Loft Literary Center brings in local and national authors to read poetry and prose, sometimes from one author’s book, and sometimes from several authors’ works about to explore a theme or celebrate an award.

5. See a Film—Fifty’s Style

The Riverview Theatre still has the architecture, decorations, and furniture it did during the 1950s. While not completely free (tickets cost $2), this theatre makes you feel like you stepped backward in time.

Support Local Arts

Greater TunaBy Anna Rose Meeds
One of the best ways to add a bit of creativity into your life is by attending an artistic event.  Whether you visit a sculpture museum, attend a ballet, listen to an orchestra, or watch a musical, there is much to be gained from supporting art.

On Wednesday, I went to see the two-man play Greater Tuna at my university.  Scathingly hilarious, satire filled this entire show which kept the audience laughing and engaged with the story.  Even better, the two actors did a brilliant job of playing 20 characters.  Some of the costume changes were less than 15 seconds, but they both remained believable and amusing.  Everything from a harried housewife to an enthusiastic Baptist preacher to a dog-killing old woman to a sweet little boy appeared on the stage.  By the end of the show, you have met many types of caricatures of people from a small town.

Continue reading Support Local Arts